Right to Life of Michigan Endorsed Candidates

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Please check out the RTL of Michigan (for people outside of Michigan, please refer to the RTL center in your state) site for election endorsements.  Statistics from the Pew Research Center and the United States Census Bureau, are showing that the pro-choice side of the isle is outweighing the pro-life side in registering and getting out to vote in the primaries.  Please share these facts with your friends and family.  Post the info on your Facebook, Twitter, or personal blogs, and ask your friends to do the same.  The Resource Center at 2010 Eureka,  Wyandotte (inside the small mall at 20th and Eureka) has some great flyers to pass out or to use, itemizing the various views of the candidates on:

  • Views on the Right to Life
  • Views on Coercive Abortion
  • Views on Tax Dollars for Abortion
  • Their voting records
  • Endorsements
  • Euthanasia/Doctor-Prescribed Suicide
  • Confirming Justices
  • Their Supporters

We watched the dirty tricks of deceit, delay and destroy at Judge Kavanaugh’s Hearing yesterday and chances are things are going to even get worse the closer we get to the election.  It is time to stop the insanity, the violence, and the destructive path that the left is leading us into, and the BEST WAY TO DO THAT IS TO GET OUT AND VOTE!!!!


https://election.rtl.org/endorsements


According to the United States Census Bureau, In 2016, 61.4 percent of the citizen voting-age population reported voting, a number not statistically different from the 61.8 percent who reported voting in 2012. Voting rates have historically varied by race and Hispanic origin, and In 2012, voting rates for non-Hispanic blacks (66.6 percent) were higher than non-Hispanic whites (64.1 percent) for the first time since 1980, In 2016, turnout increased to 65.3 percent for non-Hispanic whites, but decreased to 59.6 percent for non-Hispanic blacks, which was only the second election in this series where the share of non-Hispanic black voters decreased, from 12.9 percent in 2012 to 11.9 percent in 2016.

When analyzed together, reported turnout by age, race and Hispanic origin differed in 2016 as well. In comparison to 2012, younger non-Hispanic whites between the ages of 18 to 29 and between the ages of 30 to 44 reported higher turnout in 2016, while voting rates for the two oldest groups of non-Hispanic whites were not statistically different (Figure 5). Meanwhile, for non-Hispanic blacks, turnout rates decreased in 2016 for every age group. For other race non-Hispanics and Hispanics of any race, voting rates between 2012 and 2016 were not statistically different for any age groups.

According to the Pew Research Center, The black voter turnout rate declined for the first time in 20 years in a presidential election, falling to 59.6% in 2016 after reaching a record-high 66.6% in 2012. The 7-percentage-point decline from the previous presidential election is the largest on record for blacks. (It’s also the largest percentage-point decline among any racial or ethnic group since white voter turnout dropped from 70.2% in 1992 to 60.7% in 1996.) The number of black voters also declined, falling by about 765,000 to 16.4 million in 2016, representing a sharp reversal from 2012.

The Latino voter turnout rate held steady at 47.6% in 2016, compared with 48.0% in 2012. the number of Latino voters grew to a record 12.7 million in 2016, up from 11.2 million in 2012. Even so, the number of Latino nonvoters – those eligible to vote who do not cast a ballot, or 14 million in 2016 – was larger than the number of Latino voters, a trend that extends back to each presidential election since 1996. Meanwhile, the Asian voter turnout rate increased to 49.3% in 2016, up from 46.9% in 2012 and surpassing Hispanics for the first time since 1996. Asians continue to represent a smaller share of voters than Hispanics: Overall, about 5 million Asians voted in 2016, up from 3.8 million in 2012.
Americans appear to be more engaged with this year’s midterm elections than they typically are. Not only do about half of registered voters report being more enthusiastic than usual about voting, up from 40% in 2014, but turnout has surged in the 31 states that already have held their congressional primaries – particularly among Democrats.

The total number of votes cast in Democratic House primaries so far this year is 84% higher than the total for the equivalent point in 2014. One reason: There have been a lot more contested primaries, which tend to attract more voters.
Republican turnout in House primaries also has increased, from a combined 8.6 million votes at this point in 2014 (7% of registered voters) to 10.7 million (7.9%) so far this year. But the increase is much smaller (24%) than on the Democratic side, and the total number of votes cast in Democratic House primaries is considerably higher. Overall turnout in U.S. Senate and gubernatorial primaries also is above 2014 levels.

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